Sunday, April 6, 2008

The Meaning of "Jangaron"

Eventually, this post will unveil the meaning of the game's name, "Jangaron".
Jangaron stands for many things: fun, a hobby project, an attempt to gain eternal fame, but also a proof-of-concept for a tool set that allows using a subset of JavaScript 2 / ECMAScript 4 in browsers limited to JavaScript 1.x. I already mentioned the central tool, the JavaScript 2 to 1.x compiler, in a previous post.
The project that has the goal to put this whole tool set online as Open Source and create a community around it is code-named "Jangaroo". The rationale for that name is like so:
  • The project was initiated by a group with the nerdish and preposterous name "True Kangaroo" (which I am a member of...).
  • We wanted an artificial name (like all those other cool Web 2.0 projects have) with lots of "oooo"s in it. In fact, it is so artificial that a Google search only returns some folks using "Jangaroo" as their user name in some obscure forums and at Digg, and I'm pretty sure that Andrew Croshaw is not the type who sues us to grab the domain. Are you, Andy? The same holds true for "Jangaron", where the only off-topic match is on a Mongolian Online Music page. Let's just hope that "Jangaron" is not a Mongolian swear word or something... but would then someone name a song like that?
  • While the "J" is most often used for Java frameworks, here, it stands mainly for JavaScript (unfortunately, JSangaroo was too unpronounceable). Well, the tools are written in Java, so in either case, there is a lot of "J" in the project!
Of course, my pseudonym "Joo" is nothing but a short version of "Jangaroo" (and also resembles the name "Joe"). Note that it can be written entirely using JavaScript's most important symbol, the square bracket. Self-evidently, the compiler mentioned above is is called "jooc", pronounced like "juice".
As you might have already guessed, the "n" in "Jangaron" simply rhymes with "Tron".
There you go.

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